Our Work in Africa: Malawi


Malawi

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A key strategy of the Government of Malawi, through the Department of Nutrition and HIV/AIDS, Office of the President and Cabinet, has been to develop nutrition interventions targeting the first 24-month period of the life cycle.

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A key strategy of the Government of Malawi, through the Department of Nutrition and HIV/AIDS, Office of the President and Cabinet, has been to develop nutrition interventions targeting the first 24-month period of the life cycle. These interventions include maternal nutrition, infant and young child feeding practices, water, sanitation and hygiene. These interventions are within the National Nutrition Policy and Strategic Pan of Malawi released in 2010. In 2012 the Nutrition Innovation Lab was awarded buy-in funds for capacity building in nutrition.  An Associate Award was then granted at the December 2014 to continue these activities.  The aim of the Nutrition Innovation Lab work is to build pre-service capacity in Malawi which will in turn, build trained nutrition experts to scale to carry out the Government’s interventions.

We are partnering with Bunda College of LUANAR University, the College of Medicine, and several  Ministries of the Government of Malawi.

The Nutrition Innovation Lab has undertaken the following activities in Malawi:

  • Curriculum Review of nutrition in higher education, as requested by the Ministry of Health
  • Assisting with establishment of a dietetics program at Bunda College, in collaboration with the College of Medicine and other partners
  • Faculty development at Bunda College
  • Construction of new Malawi-specific food composition tables, with assistance from FAO
Cover-Brown et al 2014

Using satellite remote sensing and household survey data to assess human health and nutrition response to environmental change

Authors: Molly E. Brown; Kathryn Grace; Gerald Shively; Kiersten B. Johnson; Mark Carroll
Climate change and degradation of ecosystem services functioning may threaten the ability of current agricultural systems to keep up with demand for adequate and inexpensive food and for clean water, waste disposal and other broader ecosystem services. Human health is likely to be affected by changes occurring across multiple geographic and time scales. Impacts range from increasing transmissibility and the range of vectorborne diseases, such as malaria and yellow fever, to undermining nutrition through deleterious impacts on food production and concomitant increases in food prices....
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Agnes Mbachi Mwangwela, PhD, Nutrition Innovation Lab

Senior Lecturer in Food Science and Dean
Faculty of Food and Human Sciences
P.O. Box 219,
Lilongwe
Malawi

Elizabeth Marino-Costello, MS, RD, FADA

Program Manager
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University
150 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA 02111
(p) 617.636.3774
(f) 617.636.3727
elizabeth.marino_costello@tufts.edu
SKYPE: liz.marino.costello

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